Shape Shift (Yes, More shapes, I Love Them)

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Just look! Shapes are all around you. You can just observe them or you can shift them, change them, rearrange them anyway you’d like! You could make a crescent and a trapezoid look like a fish. You could turn a rectangle and a circle into a car. You could even make a clown upside down, if you wanted, it just takes some looking and a bit of creativity. With Hesselberth’s fun, simple, and colorful illustrations, the reader will learn about the many shapes around them and how to see them differently. Each page provides questions that reach for answers and participation from the audience. This concept of participation and learning is great for school circle time or can simply be for fun. Hesselberth’s work is recommended for ages 4 to 7.

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Christy Ottaviano Books/Henry Hold and Company, Ages 4 to 7, $16.99

 

The Good/Bad List (and a story!):

  • Good: Love abstract, simple, colorful, and textured illustrations. Love the layout/design of the book. The illustrations made me (and the parents I showed Hesselberth’s work to) want to turn the page and see what the shapes created.
  • Good: There are many questions, sounds, and little bits that call for participation.
  • Bad: In the manuscript, there were certain parts that vaguely rhymed (or at least had a rhythm) that I enjoyed a lot, but it wasn’t consistent enough for me personally (though the parents didn’t seem to be affected in anyway, I’m probably just picky)
  • Bad: Story time! So one lady who has a grandchild  with a speech impediment says he has a problem pronouncing S and F. She told me that the first thing she thought about Shape Shift was how her grandchild would not be able to pronounce that correctly… meaning that he would accidentally say a curse word instead of the word “shift.” I did not think of this AT ALL when I saw this book, but when that was mentioned, the two other parents nodded in agreement. O_O this is probably not that bad, but it is worth mentioning.
  • Good: It think this has some re-readability. I don’t think this has the ability like Pete the Cat does or Dragons Love Tacos but for a shape learning book, I think it’s fun enough to read again.

That’s all Folks! If you would like to look at Hesselberth’s work, go here.

 

 

 

 

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